sculpture

“. . . . rigorously defined by straight edges, right angles, a smooth surface. The spectator is asked to investigate the object and to share in its creation by cautious new ordering of the elements. His interpretation is then organized in the conscious, non-reflex movements of his hands and becomes a realization of his aesthetic responsiveness. Yet in the pieces themselves, no profound change has been induced. Keeping their identity, they have acted as catalysts in activating the sensitivity of the spectator.”

-Hans Breder, Constructivist Tendencies catalogue, 1970

Cube on a Striped Surface, 1964

Cube on a Striped Surface, 1964

Cube on a striped surface

Breder sets polished or transparent cubes over mirrors or stripes to mingle virtual with real images, and thus removes the barrier between the real and the looking-glass world.

-George Rickey, Constructivism: Origins and Evolution, 1967

Ordered by Telephone, 1969

Ordered by Telephone, 1969

Ordered by Telephone

The sculpture Ordered By Telephone exemplifies Breder’s conceptual methods; the work is composed of Plexiglas sheets ordered to precise specifications from an industrial fabricator, leaving the artist no material role in the work’s production.

Untitled, 1967

Untitled, 1967

Untitled